The Super Bowl Ad Data You Haven't Seen

February 7, 2018 Lacey Miller

This week kicks off the frenzy of leeching SEO juice thoughtfully analyzing data from Super Bowl discussions, so here we go!

 

The commercials, the ratings, the players, the teams, you name it! There’s a massive amount analysis out there. But as brands fight over the top tweet, YouTube video, or Facebook repost, we’re going to dive deeper into the data you haven’t seen; the actionable data that comes from analyzing the earned media mentions that have far more staying power and brand impact.

 

Because even after all that social media momentum, “Selfie Kid” is probably getting more retweets/shares than any of those post. (Spredfast, Hootsuite, Sprout Social, Union Metrics: want to send me the analysis? I’m in!)

 

 

Deeper Than Surface Level: Movie Trailers

If a blockbuster hopeful didn’t make it into the top 10 ads, was it a failure? Hardly.
 

If we take a look at the data, and dig deeper than surface level “counting”, we can draw actionable conclusions about the performance of the ad.

 

[I want to note, my TrendKite analysis for this post is based on meaningful coverage of the ads that ran with the specific purpose of being played during the Super Bowl. I’m also focused on headline coverage to ensure that we can cut out distractions such as paid advertisements and passing mentions. Now let’s dig in!]

 

 

 

The big film winners of the day, Mission Impossible: Fallout, Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, and Solo: A Star Wars Story, bringing to light that the media loves sequels, prequels, or just familiarity in general. In truth, it’s easier to pick up and write about something that already has a strong backstory, and one that journalists already know audiences love to talk about. This reiterates two ideas: to get journalists writing about your brand, access to their current areas of interest and articles are a must; PR teams have to play off stories their target journalists are already very familiar with writing. And two, pitches have to provide the media with data (SEO impact; social amplifications, etc.) that shows their target audience is interested in the story. Do these two things and they can’t not write the story!

 

On that note, the PR team repping the film ‘The Avengers: Infinity War” is probably scratching their heads right now...they fall into a similar bucket as Mission Impossible, Jurassic World, and Star Wars, but barely nudged out action flicks Skyscraper and Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan. So, what makes the other films more newsworthy? And what can the ‘Avengers’ team do to get more media buzz?

 

Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan is a completely different thought process, as Amazon Prime is one of the newest players in the world of film. They grabbed a top 10 spot on YouTube views, but barely scratched the surface with the media. So, the question for that team is this: are they satisfied with grabbing some of the pie,  or were they expecting to see stronger media feedback with a $5 million Super Bowl commercial strategy?(Or is this a major disconnect between marketing and PR?)

 

This brings us back to high level analytics, specifically YouTube views. The PR team for the new Mission Impossible film, might be discouraged that other future blockbusters cracked the top 10 and they didn’t. But when comparing MI: Fallout to other films in regards to who the media is writing about, they’re getting valuable traction that will live longer and is much further reaching than one mention in a YouTube top 10 list.

 

Crushing a Viral PR Crisis: Tide

Let’s address the Tide pod in the room and dig into the consumer facing products. These guys are vying for our attention, money, and loyalty at every turn. As TV commercials become obsolete (thanks to Amazon and Netflix), product placement becomes the norm, viral campaigns are the hope of every brand, and sneaking #ads into instagram feeds is the latest annoyance. Then comes one of a few times a year people actually watch an event LIVE. With all of those eyeballs, and $5 million for the pleasure, virality is key.

 

And, the public relations team at Tide is celebrating how well they crushed one of the oddest crisis comms situations we’ve seen this year. One can argue that Uber and Wells Fargo created their own crises, but Tide? Those guys were the unfortunate victims of a weird internet craze…

 

There is no doubt they used this captive audience to their benefit, and it worked!

 

The media mentions of the ‘Tide Pod Challenge’ have tanked, completely overtaken by the incredible genius of the #itsaTideAd Super Bowl spots. This reiterates public relations as a cross-team role. Understanding where the marketing team was headed no doubt helped get Tide vault out of this PR crisis.

 

(Also, did you notice, Tide only used their bottles in these commercials…good on you, Tide)

 


 

The Super Budweiser Bowl

With the Super Bowl being such a boozy event, it’s odd to see so few players take the advertisement plunge.

 

Well, “craft beer” Goose Island tried.

 

But let’s be real, Super Bowl ads are an expense that only mass market beers can afford.  And maybe the Budweiser brand has exerted its dominance enough to intimidate others away from even trying, because we really only saw four major players (analyzing them as individual brands): Stella Artois, Bud Light, Budweiser, and Michelob Ultra.

 

The thing that blows my mind is how dominating Budweiser was with ONE ad. They dominated with a single commercial. Even Stella Artois went the philanthropic route, but still didn’t see the media pick up that Budweiser did.

 

The good news is, all four brands solidified their presence with their earned media successes; successes that they can now leverage throughout the year. Stella Artois, Bud Light, Budweiser, and Michelob Ultra have set the stage for others, which also opens the door for some amazing newsjacking strategies.


 

We’ve seen the tweets come and go, we’ve been told which ads “won” the super Bowl, but more importantly, we’ve analyzed the earned media wins from the big players in the Super Bowl ad space. What’s going to be interesting moving forward is how other brands leverage what succeeded (seriously, good job Tide) and what failed (Dodge Ram and MLK). Using these big brand name examples open the door for the next wave of great earned media wins.

 

It’s also a new year. Reporters are changing beats, diving into new strategies, and evaluating new data. Understand those pieces and create the beginning of next level, data-driven outreach with the data journalists crave!

 

Advanced PR Analytics Software

 

About the Author

Lacey Miller

Passionate about public relations and empowering practitioners, Lacey Miller found her dream job as content marketing manager at TrendKite, where she carries the crown of 'word nerd'. With a background in public relations and technology, she's a great fit with her desire to innovate the industry! You can find her most days writing for PR Forward, PRSA, and other trade publications.

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